Tag Archives: Trader Joe’s

A Special Report

Groceries.

Max Loeb of White Plains, with his bag of groceries from Trader Joe’s in Hartsdale. Photo by Tania Savayan/lohud.

A&P’s bankruptcy made it clear. lohud’s readers are passionate about buying food. The closure of a major chain like A&P affected our community — and groceries, without doubt, are a cultural touchstone here in the Lower Hudson Valley.

 Indeed, the landscape of food shopping here is a complex one. There are major chains like Stop&Shop, local chains such as DeCicco’s, big-box discount stores, ethnic markets large and small, and corner stores.

With this project, lohud’s team set out to explain and demystify the industry, design, past, present and future of how we feed our families.

People are passionate about groceries in the Lower Hudson Valley. Video by Tania Savayan/lohud

Find a simple guide to “Groceries.” stories below.

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Business, Culture

After A&P: You are where you shop

Two-year-old Alexandra Chang holds on to blueberry waffles, her favorite breakfast choice, as her babysitter Taeko Reilly of Chappaqua, shops for bread at DeCicco & Sons in Armonk. Photo by Tania Savayan/lohud

These changes are more than real-estate transactions. They highlight the relationship shoppers have with their supermarkets

Chestnut Ridge’s Cathy Murphy thought she was in her supermarket, but she was wrong.

“I knew something was happening with A&P, but I didn’t even realize when I walked in that it was a different store,” she said. “Then I saw they didn’t have the self-checkout and I was like, ‘What is going on?’”

What was going on was that Murphy’s A&P, just across the New Jersey line in Woodcliff Lake, had become an Acme supermarket last month without her noticing. And Acme doesn’t use self-checkout aisles.

Gone was her A&P’s growing selection of organic food to which Murphy had become accustomed, in aisles she had navigated for nearly a decade. Things weren’t where they used to be.

What is going on across the Lower Hudson Valley is a dizzying and seismic shift in the local supermarket landscape, as dozens of bankrupt A&P stores have changed hands seemingly overnight to become Key Foods or Acmes or, in at least one high-profile case in Yonkers, a grocery-selling CVS.

These changes are more than real-estate transactions. They bring to light the primal and personal relationship shoppers have with their supermarkets.

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Business, Culture

Cult followings


Wegmans’ floral department in Rochester. Photo by Jamie Germano/Rochester Democrat and Chronicle

Rabid fans of Trader Joe’s and Wegmans flock to their favorite stores

Mention their name in the right company and you’ll trigger wistful, faraway looks or breathless salivation: Wegmans and Trader Joe’s.

“I love Wegmans!” says Karen Parish of Pound Ridge. “My daughter goes to Cornell and she’s bringing me something back from Wegmans when she comes back from school. They have a stir-fry sauce that is unbelievable! I told her to bring me back three bottles. I called her and said, ‘Don’t forget to go to Wegmans!’”

When Parish heard the A&P in Mount Kisco was closing, she hoped it would become a Wegmans. (Turns out, it was sold to the highest bidder, Stop&Shop, for $25 million, the most lucrative sale in the bankrupty liquidation.)

“Their food is unbelievable, so fresh. I sometimes shop at Fairway in Stamford because I live on the border. But it’s no Wegmans.”

Meanwhile, Trader Joe’s inspires people to drive long distances to stock up on supplies of frozen and packaged goods.

While Wegmans stores are huge and Trader Joe’s are deliberately smaller, both supermarket chains have avid, some might say rabid, fan bases who crave a store in their neighborhood.

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Culture

Food fetish favorites

A shopper looks over the items in the bakery section at DeCicco’s Family Market in New City. Photo by Tania Savayan/lohud.

We’ve all got that special product for which we will take a special trip to a specific store.

I took to Facebook and asked for yours. Turns out, lots of people have a food fetish.

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Multimedia

Audio: Shop along with Dawna Dennis

Dawna Dennis. Photo by Tania Savayan/lohud

Dawna Dennis knows who she is. She’s a 39-year-old married mother of three girls. They have a dog.

What they don’t have, yet, is one steady grocery store they can call their own. The family moved to Yorktown from Seattle in August but they’ve yet to settle on the store that gives them everything they’re looking for.

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