Tag Archives: Turco’s

Business, Venues

Local chains cultivate customer loyalty

A woman tends the blueberries at Stew Leonard’s in Yonkers. Photo by Tania Savayan/lohud

A look at three regional supermarket success stories: Turco’s, Stew Leonard’s, DeCicco’s

Michael Powell has a simple rule: Every store needs a story.

Powell works at the Los Angeles-based research and design firm Shook Kelley, helping markets sharpen their skills and define themselves: to tell their story.

“I think, in the past, it had become acceptable to say ‘We’re just running a grocery store. This is a big business operation and we happen to be selling food,’” Powell says. “I don’t think that’s acceptable, anymore. I think people want to believe that you have some kind of passion for food.”

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Business, Culture

After A&P: You are where you shop

Two-year-old Alexandra Chang holds on to blueberry waffles, her favorite breakfast choice, as her babysitter Taeko Reilly of Chappaqua, shops for bread at DeCicco & Sons in Armonk. Photo by Tania Savayan/lohud

These changes are more than real-estate transactions. They highlight the relationship shoppers have with their supermarkets

Chestnut Ridge’s Cathy Murphy thought she was in her supermarket, but she was wrong.

“I knew something was happening with A&P, but I didn’t even realize when I walked in that it was a different store,” she said. “Then I saw they didn’t have the self-checkout and I was like, ‘What is going on?’”

What was going on was that Murphy’s A&P, just across the New Jersey line in Woodcliff Lake, had become an Acme supermarket last month without her noticing. And Acme doesn’t use self-checkout aisles.

Gone was her A&P’s growing selection of organic food to which Murphy had become accustomed, in aisles she had navigated for nearly a decade. Things weren’t where they used to be.

What is going on across the Lower Hudson Valley is a dizzying and seismic shift in the local supermarket landscape, as dozens of bankrupt A&P stores have changed hands seemingly overnight to become Key Foods or Acmes or, in at least one high-profile case in Yonkers, a grocery-selling CVS.

These changes are more than real-estate transactions. They bring to light the primal and personal relationship shoppers have with their supermarkets.

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Multimedia

Audio: Shop along with Dawna Dennis

Dawna Dennis. Photo by Tania Savayan/lohud

Dawna Dennis knows who she is. She’s a 39-year-old married mother of three girls. They have a dog.

What they don’t have, yet, is one steady grocery store they can call their own. The family moved to Yorktown from Seattle in August but they’ve yet to settle on the store that gives them everything they’re looking for.

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